Occupation Profile for Statisticians

Engage in the development of mathematical theory or apply statistical theory and methods to collect, organize, interpret, and summarize numerical data to provide usable information. May specialize in fields, such as bio-statistics, agricultural statistics, business statistics, economic statistics, or other fields.

 
 

Significant Points

  • About 30 percent of statisticians work for Federal, State, and local governments; other employers include scientific research and development services and finance and insurance firms.
  • A master’s degree in statistics or mathematics is the minimum educational requirement for most jobs as a statistician.
  • Employment of statisticians is projected to grow about as fast as average.
  • Individuals with a degree in statistics should have opportunities in a variety of fields.

 

 
 
Overview
$65,720.00 Median Annual Wage 1,000 Average Job Openings Per Year
2.2 Average Unemployment Percentage 0.0 Percentage That Completed High School
22,000 Employment Numbers in 2006 6.1 Percentage That Had Some College
24,000 Employment Numbers in 2016 (est.) 93.3 Percentage That Went Beyond College Degree

Sample Job Titles
Actuary
Analytical Statistician
Applied Statistician
Bioinformatics Specialist
Biometrician
Biostatistician
Clinical Biostatistics Director
Clinical Data Coordinator
Clinical Statistics Manager
Data Manager
Database Analyst
Education Research Analyst
Engineer, Statistical
Environmental Statistician
Financial Analyst
Human Resource Statistician
Institutional Research Director
Mathematical Statistician
Program Research Specialist
Programmer
Research Analyst
Research Associate
Research Biostatistician
Sampling Expert
Sports Statistician
Statistical Analyst
Statistical Reporting Analyst
Statistician
Statistician, Applied
Statistician, Mathematical
Survey Statistician
Technical Specialist
Time Study Statistician
Trend Investigator

Training
  • These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organizational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, aerospace engineers, physicists, school psychologists, and surgeons.
  • A bachelor's degree is the minimum formal education required for these occupations. However, many also require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).
  • Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.
  • Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

A master’s degree in statistics or mathematics is the minimum educational requirement, but research and academic jobs generally require a Ph.D., Federal Government jobs require at least a bachelor’s degree.

Education and training. A master’s degree in statistics or mathematics usually is the minimum educational requirement for most statistician jobs. Research and academic positions usually require a Ph.D. in statistics. Beginning positions in industrial research often require a master’s degree combined with several years of experience.

Jobs with the Federal Government require at least a bachelor’s degree. The training required for employment as an entry-level statistician in the Federal Government is a bachelor’s degree, including at least 15 semester hours of statistics or a combination of 15 hours of mathematics and statistics, if at least 6 semester hours are in statistics. Qualifying as a mathematical statistician in the Federal Government requires 24 semester hours of mathematics and statistics, with a minimum of 6 semester hours in statistics and 12 semester hours in an area of advanced mathematics, such as calculus, differential equations, or vector analysis.

In 2007, more than 200 universities offered a degree program in statistics, biostatistics, or mathematics. Many other schools also offered graduate-level courses in applied statistics for students majoring in biology, business, economics, education, engineering, psychology, and other fields. Acceptance into graduate statistics programs does not require an undergraduate degree in statistics, although good training in mathematics is essential.

Many schools also offered degrees in mathematics, operations research, and other fields that include a sufficient number of courses in statistics to qualify graduates for some entry-level positions with the Federal Government. Required subjects for statistics majors include differential and integral calculus, statistical methods, mathematical modeling, and probability theory. Additional recommended courses for undergraduates include linear algebra, design and analysis of experiments, applied multivariate analysis, and mathematical statistics.

Because computers are used extensively for statistical applications, a strong background in computer science is highly recommended. For positions involving quality and productivity improvement, training in engineering or physical science is useful. A background in biological, chemical, or health science is important for positions involving the preparation and testing of pharmaceutical or agricultural products. Courses in economics and business administration are helpful for many jobs in market research, business analysis, and forecasting.

Advancements in technology have made a great impact on statistics. Statistical modeling continues to become quicker and easier because of increased computational power and new analytical methods or software. Continuing education is important for statisticians; they need to stay abreast emerging technologies to perform well.

Other qualifications. Good communications skills are important for prospective statisticians in industry, who often need to explain technical matters to persons without statistical expertise. An understanding of business and the economy also is valuable for those who plan to work in private industry.

Advancement. Beginning statisticians generally are supervised by an experienced statistician. With experience, they may advance to positions with more technical responsibility and, in some cases, supervisory duties. Opportunities for promotion are greater for people with advanced degrees. Master’s and Ph.D. degree holders usually enjoy independence in their work and may engage in research; develop statistical methods; or, after a number of years of experience in a particular area, become statistical consultants.

Nature of Work

Statistics is the scientific application of mathematical principles to the collection, analysis, and presentation of numerical data. Statisticians apply their mathematical and statistical knowledge to the design of surveys and experiments; the collection, processing, and analysis of data; and the interpretation of the experiment and survey results. Opinion polls, statements of accuracy on scales and other measuring devises, and information about average earnings in an occupation are all usually the work of statisticians.

Statisticians may apply their knowledge of statistical methods to a variety of subject areas, such as biology, economics, engineering, medicine, public health, psychology, marketing, education, and sports. Many economic, social, political, and military decisions cannot be made without statistical techniques, such as the design of experiments to gain Federal approval of a newly manufactured drug. Statistics might be needed to show whether the seemingly good results of a drug were likely because of the drug rather than just the effect of random variation in patient outcomes.

One technique that is especially useful to statisticians is sampling—obtaining information about a population of people or group of things by surveying a small portion of the total. For example, to determine the size of the audience for particular programs, television-rating services survey only a few thousand families, rather than all viewers. Statisticians decide where and how to gather the data, determine the type and size of the sample group, and develop the survey questionnaire or reporting form. They also prepare instructions for workers who will collect and tabulate the data. Finally, statisticians analyze, interpret, and summarize the data using computer software.

In business and industry, statisticians play an important role in quality control and in product development and improvement. In an automobile company, for example, statisticians might design experiments to determine the failure time of engines exposed to extreme weather conditions by running individual engines until failure and breakdown. Working for a pharmaceutical company, statisticians might develop and evaluate the results of clinical trials to determine the safety and effectiveness of new medications. At a computer software firm, statisticians might help construct new statistical software packages to analyze data more accurately and efficiently. In addition to product development and testing, some statisticians also are involved in deciding what products to manufacture, how much to charge for them, and to whom the products should be marketed. Statisticians also may manage assets and liabilities, determining the risks and returns of certain investments.

Statisticians also are employed by nearly every government agency. Some government statisticians develop surveys that measure population growth, consumer prices, or unemployment. Other statisticians work for scientific, environmental, and agricultural agencies and may help figure out the average level of pesticides in drinking water, the number of endangered species living in a particular area, or the number of people afflicted with a particular disease. Statisticians also are employed in national defense agencies, determining the accuracy of new weapons and the likely effectiveness of defense strategies.

Because statistical specialists are employed in so many work areas, specialists who use statistics often have different professional designations. For example, a person using statistical methods to analyze economic data may have the title econometrician, while statisticians in public health and medicine may hold titles such as biostatistician or biometrician.

Work environment. Statisticians generally work regular hours in an office environment. Sometimes, they may work more hours to meet deadlines.

Some statisticians travel to provide advice on research projects, supervise and set up surveys, or gather statistical data. While advanced communications devices such as e-mail and teleconferencing are making it easier for statisticians to work with clients in different areas, there still are situations that require the statistician to be present, such as during meetings or while gathering data.

Related Occupations

Sources: Career Guide to Industries (CGI), Occupational Information Network (O*Net), Occupation Outlook Handbook (OOH)
Earnings

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of statisticians were $65,720 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $48,480 and $87,850. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,010, while the highest 10 percent earned more than $108,630.

The average annual salary for statisticians in the Federal Government was $85,690 in 2007, while mathematical statisticians averaged $96,121.

Some employers offer tuition reimbursement.

For the latest wage information:

The above wage data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey program, unless otherwise noted. For the latest National, State, and local earnings data, visit the following pages:

  • Statisticians
  • Job Outlook

    Average employment growth is projected. Individuals with a degree in statistics should have opportunities in a variety of fields.

    Employment change. Employment of statisticians is projected to grow 9 percent from 2006 to 2016, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The demand for individuals with a background is statistics is expected to grow, although some jobs will be in occupations with titles other than statistician.

    The use of statistics is widespread and growing. Statistical models aid in decision making in both private industry and government. There will always be a demand for the skills statistical modeling provides. Technological advances are expected to spur demand for statisticians. Ever faster computer processing allows statisticians to analyze greater amounts of data much more quickly, and to gather and sort through large amounts of data that would not have been analyzed in the past. As these processes continue to become more efficient and less expensive, an increasing number of employers will want to employ statisticians to take advantage of the new information available.

    Biostatisticians should experience employment growth, primarily because of the booming pharmaceuticals business. As pharmaceutical companies develop new treatments and medical technologies, biostatisticians will be needed to do research and clinical trials.

    Job prospects. Individuals with a degree in statistics should have opportunities in a variety of fields. For example, many jobs involve the analysis and interpretation of data from economics, biological science, psychology, computer software engineering, education, and other disciplines. Additional job openings will become available as statisticians transfer to other occupations, retire, or leave the workforce for other reasons.

    Among graduates with a master’s degree in statistics, those with a strong background in an allied field, such as finance, biology, engineering, or computer science, should have the best prospects of finding jobs related to their field of study.

    Those who meet State certification requirements may become high school statistics teachers, for example. (For additional information, see the statement on teachers—preschool, kindergarten, elementary, middle, and secondary elsewhere in the Handbook.)

    Employment

    Statisticians held about 22,000 jobs in 2006. About 20 percent of these jobs were in the Federal Government, where statisticians were concentrated in the Departments of Commerce, Agriculture, and Health and Human Services. Another 10 percent were found in State and local governments, including State colleges and universities. Most of the remaining jobs were in private industry, especially in scientific research and development services, insurance carriers, and pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing.

    Knowledge
    • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
    • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
    • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
    • Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
    • Physics — Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
    Skills
    • Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
    • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
    • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
    • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
    • Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
    Abilities
    • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
    • Stamina — The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
    • Explosive Strength — The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
    • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
    • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
    Tasks
    • Core — Adapt statistical methods to solve specific problems in many fields, such as economics, biology, and engineering.
    • Core — Process large amounts of data for statistical modeling and graphic analysis, using computers.
    • Core — Develop and test experimental designs, sampling techniques, and analytical methods.
    • Core — Identify relationships and trends in data, as well as any factors that could affect the results of research.
    • Supplemental — Examine theories, such as those of probability and inference, to discover mathematical bases for new or improved methods of obtaining and evaluating numerical data.
    Activities
    • Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
    • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
    • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
    • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
    • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
    Related College Curriculum
     
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    140 Statistician Jobs Found


    Fuyao Glass America is part of Fuyao Industry Group Co. Ltd., a leading international manufacturer of automotive and industrial glass located in Ch...
    Fuyao Glass America - OH - Moraine - posted 5 days ago
    Abbott Laboratories Statistician III Location: 103 Abbott Park Road Abbott Park, IL, 60064 Initial Duration: About 6 months (11/07/2016 to 04/28/20...
    - IL - Lake Bluff - posted 1 day ago
    As part of a global team of acclaimed statisticians and statistical programmers (on-shore and offshore) you will work to develop innovative methodo...
    Quintiles - PA - Philadelphia - posted 9 days ago
    Grant Thornton is seeking a Sr Associate to join its Alexandria Data Analytics practice area and take an active role in engagement execution, proje...
    Grant Thornton - DC - Washington - posted 29 days ago
    Responsibilities: • Contribute to clinical development programs & study designs • Stay updated on relevant statistical methodology and tools • Inte...
    Lab Support, a division of On Assignment - Parsippany - posted 14 days ago
    RESEARCH STATISTICIAN DEVELOPER -SAS-the market leader in providing a new generation of business intelligence software is seeking a Research Statis...
    SAS - NC - Cary - posted 6 days ago
    MarketingSystems Group is the industry’s leading sampling company. We have an exciting opportunity for a surveyresearch statistician at its main of...
    Marketing Systems Group - Philadelphia - posted 11 days ago
    Statistician JacksonLewis is a nationwide law firm dedicated to representing management exclusivelyin workplace law and related litigation. With 57...
    Jackson Lewis - CO - Denver - posted 15 days ago
    One of our large Pharma Clients has an opening for a Statistician Contractor. This role can be Remote. Experienced with simulations, able to work i...
    - PA - King of Prussia - posted 18 days ago
    Assurex Health is a commercial-stage, informatics-based precision medicine company providing treatment decision support to healthcare providers for...
    Assurex Health - OH - Mason - posted 3 days ago

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