Occupation Profile for Dispatchers

Schedule and dispatch workers, work crews, equipment, or service vehicles for conveyance of materials, freight, or passengers, or for normal installation, service, or emergency repairs rendered outside the place of business. Duties may include using radio, telephone, or computer to transmit assignments and compiling statistics and reports on work progress.

 
 

Significant Points

  • Alternative work schedules are necessary to accommodate evening, weekend, and holiday work and 24-hour-per-day, 7-day-per-week operations.
  • Dispatchers generally are entry-level workers who are trained on the job and need no more than a high school diploma.
  • Many States require specific types of training or certification.

 

 
 
Overview
$32,190.00 Median Annual Wage 5,000 Average Job Openings Per Year
3.8 Average Unemployment Percentage 44.0 Percentage That Completed High School
190,000 Employment Numbers in 2006 45.1 Percentage That Had Some College
193,000 Employment Numbers in 2016 (est.) 10.9 Percentage That Went Beyond College Degree

Sample Job Titles
Aircraft Dispatcher
Airplane Dispatch Clerk
Alarm Operator
Auto Service Dispatcher
Burglar Alarm Operator
Bus Dispatcher
Bus Dispatcher, Interstate
Bus Starter
Cab Starter
Cab Station Attendant
Car Clerk, Pullman
Car Dispatcher
Car Distributor
Car Starter
Car Supplier
Car Tracer
Crew Dispatcher
Dinkey Dispatcher
Dispatch Clerk
Dispatch Manager
Dispatcher
Dispatcher, Aircraft
Dispatcher, Automobile or Truck Rental
Dispatcher, Bus and Trolley
Dispatcher, Maintenance Services
Dispatcher, Oil Well Services
Dispatcher, Radioactive Waste Disposal
Dispatcher, Security Guards
Dispatcher, Service or Work
Dispatcher, Ship Pilot
Dispatcher, Street Department
Dispatcher, Tow Truck
Dispatcher, Traffic or System
Dispatcher, Tugboat
Drop Board Man
Drop Board Worker
Engine Dispatcher
Fire Alarm Operator
Freight Dispatcher
Garbage Truck Dispatcher
Gas Dispatcher
Gas Load Dispatcher
Maintenance Dispatcher
Mine Car Dispatcher
Motor Coach Supervisor
Motor Vehicle Dispatcher
Oil Dispatcher
Operator
Radio Dispatcher
Rail Operations Controller
Receiver-Dispatcher
Relay Dispatcher
Repair Service Dispatcher
Routing Clerk
Scheduler, Maintenance
School Bus Dispatcher
Security Dispatcher
Service Clerk
Service Dispatcher
Signal Operator
Signal Timer
Starter
Streetcar Dispatcher
Streetcar Starter
Taxicab Coordinator
Taxicab Dispatcher
Taxicab Starter
Train Dispatcher
Train Dispatcher, Assistant Chief
Train Starter
Transportation Dispatcher
Trouble Dispatcher
Truck Dispatcher
Water Service Dispatcher
Work Order Sorting Clerk

Training
  • These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, pharmacy technicians, salespersons (retail), and tellers.
  • These occupations usually require a high school diploma and may require some vocational training or job-related course work. In some cases, an associate's or bachelor's degree could be needed.
  • Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience may be helpful in these occupations, but usually is not needed. For example, a teller might benefit from experience working directly with the public, but an inexperienced person could still learn to be a teller with little difficulty.
  • Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees.

Dispatchers generally are entry-level workers who are trained on the job and need no more than a high school diploma. Many States require specific types of training or certification.

Education and training. Workers usually develop the necessary skills on the job. This informal training lasts from several days to a few months, depending on the complexity of the job. While working with an experienced dispatcher, new employees monitor calls and learn how to operate a variety of communications equipment, including telephones, radios, and various wireless devices. As trainees gain confidence, they begin to handle calls themselves. In smaller operations, dispatchers sometimes act as customer service representatives, processing orders. Many public safety dispatchers also participate in structured training programs sponsored by their employer. Increasingly, public safety dispatchers receive training in stress and crisis management as well as in family counseling. This training helps them to provide effective services to others; and, at the same time, it helps them manage the stress involved in their work.

Licensure. Many States require specific types of training or certification from a professional association. Certification often requires several months in a classroom for instruction in computer-assisted dispatching and other emerging technologies as well as radio dispatching and stress management.

Other qualifications. State or local government civil service regulations usually govern police, fire, and emergency medical dispatching jobs. Candidates for these positions may have to pass written, oral, and performance tests. Also, they may be asked to attend training classes in order to qualify for advancement.

Communication skills and the ability to work under pressure are important personal qualities for dispatchers. Residency in the city or county of employment frequently is required for public safety dispatchers. Dispatchers in transportation industries must be able to deal with sudden influxes of shipments and disruptions of shipping schedules caused by bad weather, road construction, or accidents.

Certification and advancement. Although there are no mandatory licensing requirements, some States require that public safety dispatchers possess a certificate to work on a State network, such as the Police Information Network. Many dispatchers participate in these programs in order to improve their prospects for career advancement.

Dispatchers who work for private firms, which usually are small, will find few opportunities for advancement. In contrast, public safety dispatchers may become a shift or divisional supervisor or chief of communications, or they may move to higher paying administrative jobs. Some become police officers or fire fighters.

Nature of Work

Dispatchers schedule and dispatch workers, equipment, or service vehicles to carry materials or passengers. Some dispatchers take calls for taxi companies, for example, or for police or ambulance assistance. They keep records, logs, and schedules of the calls that they receive and of the transportation vehicles that they monitor and control. In fact, they usually prepare a detailed report on all activities occurring during their shifts. Many dispatchers employ computer-aided dispatch systems to accomplish these tasks.

All dispatchers are assigned a specific territory and have responsibility for all communications within that area. Many work in teams, especially dispatchers in large communications centers or companies. The work of dispatchers varies greatly, depending on the industry in which they work.

Police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers, also called public safety dispatchers or 911 operators, monitor the location of emergency services personnel from one or all of the jurisdiction’s emergency services departments. These workers dispatch the appropriate type and number of units in response to calls for assistance. Dispatchers, or call takers, often are the first people the public contacts when emergency assistance is required. If certified for emergency medical services, the dispatcher may provide medical instruction to those on the scene of the emergency until the medical staff arrives.

Police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers work in a variety of settings—a police station, a fire station, a hospital, or, increasingly, a centralized communications center. In some areas, one of the major departments serves as the communications center. In these situations, all emergency calls go to that department, where a dispatcher handles their calls and screens the others before transferring them to the appropriate service.

When handling calls, dispatchers question each caller carefully to determine the type, seriousness, and location of the emergency. The information obtained is posted either electronically by computer or, with decreasing frequency, by hand. The dispatcher then quickly decides the priority of the incident, the kind and number of units needed, and the location of the closest and most suitable units available. When appropriate, dispatchers stay in close contact with other service providers—for example, a police dispatcher would monitor the response of the fire department when there is a major fire. In a medical emergency, dispatchers keep in close touch not only with the dispatched units, but also with the caller. They may give extensive first-aid instructions before the emergency personnel arrive, while the caller is waiting for the ambulance. Dispatchers continuously give updates on the patient’s condition to the ambulance personnel and often serve as a link between the medical staff in a hospital and the emergency medical technicians in the ambulance. (A separate statement on emergency medical technicians and paramedics appears elsewhere in the Handbook.)

Other dispatchers coordinate deliveries, service calls, and related activities for a variety of firms. Truck dispatchers, who work for local and long-distance trucking companies, coordinate the movement of trucks and freight between cities. These dispatchers direct the pickup and delivery activities of drivers, receive customers’ requests for the pickup and delivery of freight, consolidate freight orders into truckloads for specific destinations, assign drivers and trucks, and draw up routes and pickup and delivery schedules. Bus dispatchers make sure that local and long-distance buses stay on schedule. They handle all problems that may disrupt service, and they dispatch other buses or arrange for repairs in order to restore service and schedules. Train dispatchers ensure the timely and efficient movement of trains according to orders and schedules. They must be aware of track switch positions, track maintenance areas, and the location of other trains running on the track. Taxicab dispatchers, or starters, dispatch taxis in response to requests for service and keep logs on all road service calls. Tow-truck dispatchers take calls for emergency road service. They relay the nature of the problem to a nearby service station or a tow-truck service and see to it that the road service is completed. Gas and water service dispatchers monitor gaslines and water mains, and send out service trucks and crews to take care of emergencies.

Work environment. The work of dispatchers can be very hectic when many calls come in at the same time. The job of public safety dispatchers is particularly stressful because a slow or an improper response to a call can result in serious injury or further harm. Also, callers who are anxious or afraid may become excited and be unable to provide needed information; some may even become abusive. Despite provocations, dispatchers must remain calm, objective, and in control of the situation.

Dispatchers sit for long periods, using telephones, computers, and two-way radios. Much of their time is spent at video display terminals, viewing monitors and observing traffic patterns. As a result of working for long stretches with computers and other electronic equipment, dispatchers can experience significant eyestrain and back discomfort. Generally, dispatchers work a 40-hour week; however, rotating shifts and compressed work schedules are common. Alternative work schedules are necessary to accommodate evening, weekend, and holiday work and 24-hour-per-day, 7-day-per-week operations.

Related Occupations

Sources: Career Guide to Industries (CGI), Occupational Information Network (O*Net), Occupation Outlook Handbook (OOH)
Earnings

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of dispatchers, except police, fire, and ambulance in May 2006 were $32,190. The middle 50 percent earned between $24,860 and $42,030. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,780, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $53,250.

Median annual wage-and-salary earnings of police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers in 2006 were $31,470. The middle 50 percent earned between $25,200 and $39,040. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $20,010, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $47,190.

For the latest wage information:

The above wage data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey program, unless otherwise noted. For the latest National, State, and local earnings data, visit the following pages:

  • Police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers
  • Dispatchers, except police, fire, and ambulance
  • Job Outlook

    Employment of dispatchers is expected to grow more slowly than average. In addition to those positions resulting from job growth, many openings will arise from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or leave the labor force.

    Employment change. Employment of dispatchers is expected to increase 6 percent over the 2006-16 decade, more slowly than the average for all occupations. Population growth and economic expansion are expected to spur employment growth for all types of dispatchers. The growing and aging population will increase demand for emergency services and stimulate employment growth of police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers.

    Job prospects. In addition to openings due to growth, job openings will result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or leave the labor force. Many districts are consolidating their communications centers into a shared area-wide facility. As the equipment becomes more complex, individuals with computer skills and experience will have a greater opportunity for employment as public safety dispatchers.

    Employment of some dispatchers is more adversely affected by economic downturns than employment of other dispatchers. For example, when economic activity falls, demand for transportation services declines. As a result, taxicab, train, and truck dispatchers may experience layoffs or a shortened workweek, and jobseekers may have some difficulty finding entry-level jobs. Employment of tow-truck dispatchers, by contrast, is seldom affected by general economic conditions, because of the emergency nature of their business. Likewise, public safety dispatchers are unlikely to be affected by economic downturns.

    Employment

    Dispatchers held 289,000 jobs in May of 2006. About 34 percent were police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers, almost all of whom worked for State and local governments—primarily local police and fire departments. About 28 percent of all dispatchers worked in the transportation and warehousing industry, and the rest worked in a wide variety of mainly service-providing industries.

    Although dispatching jobs are found throughout the country, most dispatchers work in urban areas, where large communications centers and businesses are located.

    Knowledge
    • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
    • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
    • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
    • Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
    • Physics — Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
    Skills
    • Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
    • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
    • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
    • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
    • Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
    Abilities
    • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
    • Stamina — The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
    • Explosive Strength — The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
    • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
    • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
    Tasks
    • Core — Receive or prepare work orders.
    • Core — Oversee all communications within specifically assigned territories.
    • Core — Monitor personnel or equipment locations and utilization to coordinate service and schedules.
    • Core — Record and maintain files and records of customer requests, work or services performed, charges, expenses, inventory, and other dispatch information.
    • Core — Determine types or amounts of equipment, vehicles, materials, or personnel required according to work orders or specifications.
    Activities
    • Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
    • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
    • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
    • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
    • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

    1367 Dispatcher Jobs Found


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    Express Employment Professionals - IL - Elgin - posted 22 days ago
    Ultiamte Staffing is seeking Dispatchers with strong customer service skills. The dispatcher will Modify, adjust, and monitor the delivery plan for...
    Ultimate - San Antonio - posted 20 days ago
    Due to business growth Decker Truck Line, Inc. has opportunities available for experienced individuals to join our team as Fleet Manager / Dispatch...
    The Decker Companies - IA - Fort Dodge - posted 3 days ago
    Administrative Assistant / Dispatcher This logistics company that works with railways is looking for a temp-to-hire candidate that is structured an...
    - GA - Doraville - posted 6 days ago
    SUMMARY: Under general direction of the Dispatch Manager, the Dispatcher is responsible for meeting the local and/or long distance pick up and deli...
    Ultimate - Cerritos - posted 13 days ago
    Position Summary The Dispatcher will be responsible for the coordination of drivers, trucks, and containers to create capacity, maximize productivi...
    WCA Waste Corporation - Southwest Houston - posted 15 days ago
    Overview: Securiguard Inc. is accepting applications for Security Dispatcher at the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Responsibilities: Dut...
    Securiguard Incorporated. - Washington - posted 4 days ago
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    First Transit - IL - McHenry - posted 5 days ago
    Our client, a leader in the transportation industry located on the Southside of Chicago, is looking to hire a Dispatcher immediately. Due to recent...
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