Occupation Profile for Stock Clerks- Stockroom, Warehouse, or Storage Yard

Receive, store, and issue materials, equipment, and other items from stockroom, warehouse, or storage yard. Keep records and compile stock reports.

 
 

Significant Points

  • Stock clerks and order fillers generally are entry-level workers who learn through short-term on-the-job training.
  • Despite the projected decline in employment due to the use of automation in factories, warehouses, and stores, numerous job openings are expected due to replacement needs.
  • Because of automation, applicants who are familiar with computers and other electronic office and business equipment will have the best job prospects.

 

 
 
Sample Job Titles
Agent Contract Clerk
Athletic Gear Custodian
Bay Stocker
Camera Storage Clerk
Central Service Supply Distributor
Central Supply Aide
Central Supply Technician
Central Supply Worker
Checker, Bakery Products
Cloth Boy
Cloth Burler
Cloth Worker
Crib Attendant
Crib Clerk
Crib Tender
Custodian
Custodian, Athletic Equipment
Cut-File Clerk
Cycle Counter
Dairy Clerk
Die Keeper
Die Storage Worker
Divisional Storekeeper
Drug Coordinator
Field Recorder
Fuel Oil Clerk
Gear Keeper
Gear Room Keeper
Gearman
Inspector, Stock, Clerical
Inventory Checker
Inventory Clerk
Inventory Control Clerk
Inventory Control Specialist
Inventory Controller
Inventory Coordinator
Inventory Management Specialist
Inventory Planner
Inventory Taker
Inventory Technician
Kitchen Clerk
Linen Clerk
Linen Room Attendant
Magazine Keeper
Marine Gear Keeper
Material Clerk
Material Handler
Material Yard Clerk
Meat Clerk
Mechanic, Cargo Gear
Merchandise Distributor
Merchandise Handler
Merchandise Receiver and Shipper
Mold Puller
Odd-Piece Checker
Oil House Attendant
Order Selector
Outsole Scheduler
Paint Stock Clerk
Paint Stockman
Parts Classifier
Parts Clerk
Parts Control Clerk
Parts Identifier
Parts Lister
Parts Order and Stock Clerk
Parts Puller
Parts Technician
Pattern Attendant
Pattern Clerk
Pattern Keeper
Pattern Room Attendant
Pattern Storage Clerk
Pattern Vault Clerk
Perpetual Inventory Clerk
Powder Monkey
Powder Nipper
Prescription Clerk, Lens and Frames
Property Clerk
Property Custodian
Protective Clothing Issuer
Quality Control Clerk
Receiving Associate
Receiving Clerk
Receiving Lead
Return to Vendor Associate (RTV Associate)
Revolving Inventory Clerk
Router
Shipper/Receiver
Shipping and Receiving Clerk
Shipping Technician
Space and Storage Clerk
Stock Checker
Stock Clerk
Stock Clerk, Delivery
Stock Control Clerk
Stock Controller
Stock Counter
Stock Sorter
Stock Taker
Stock Tracer
Stock Unloader
Stock Worker and Deliverer
Stocker
Stockman
Stockroom Attendant
Stockroom Clerk
Stockroom Inventory Clerk
Stockroom Keeper
Stockroom Selector
Stockroom Worker
Storehouse Clerk
Storekeeper
Storeroom Attendant
Storeroom Clerk
Storeroom Keeper
Stores Clerk
Supply Aide
Supply Cataloguer
Supply Clerk
Supply Coordinator
Supply Crib Attendant
Supply Person
Supply Room Clerk
Swatch Clerk
Technician, Supervisor, Central Supply
Template Clerk
Template Storage Clerk
Throw Out Clerk
Tool Clerk
Tool Crib Attendant
Tool Crib Clerk
Tool Dispatcher
Tool Distributor
Tool Keeper
Tool Room Attendant
Tool Storage Attendant
Tool Supervisor
Tool Tender
Toolman
Toolroom Attendant
Toolroom Clerk
Toolroom Keeper
Tooth Clerk
Transfer Worker
Transformer Stock Clerk
Traveling Storekeeper
Warehouse Assistant
Warehouse Associate
Warehouse Clerk
Warehouse Loader
Warehouse Packer
Warehouse Record Clerk
Warehouse Representative
Warehouse Specialist
Warehouse Stocker
Warehouse Technician
Warehouse Worker
Warehouse Worker, Clerical
Warehouseman
Warehouseman, Clerical
Warehouser
Yard Clerk

Training
  • These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include taxi drivers, amusement and recreation attendants, counter and rental clerks, cashiers, and waiters/waitresses.
  • These occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate. Some may require a formal training course to obtain a license.
  • No previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a cashier even if he/she has never worked before.
  • Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.

Stock clerk and order fillers generally are entry-level workers who do not need more than a high school diploma or GED. Short-term on-the-job training is usually adequate for this occupation.

Education and training. Stock clerks and order fillers usually learn the job by doing routine tasks under close supervision. They learn how to count and mark stock and later to keep records and take inventory. Training in the use of automated equipment usually is done informally, on the job. As this occupation becomes more automated, however, workers may need longer periods of training to master the use of the equipment.

Other qualifications. Strength, stamina, good eyesight, and an ability to work at repetitive tasks, sometimes under pressure, are important characteristics. Stock clerks and order fillers who handle jewelry, liquor, or drugs may be bonded. Employers prefer to hire those familiar with computers and other electronic office and business equipment. Typing, filing, recordkeeping, and other clerical skills also are important in some jobs.

Advancement. Advancement opportunities for stock clerks and order fillers vary with the place of employment. With additional training, some workers advance to jobs as warehouse leads or supervisors, purchasing agents or other jobs within the facility such as inventory control.

Nature of Work

Stock clerks and order fillers receive, unpack, check, store, track merchandise or materials, and pick up customer orders. They keep records of items entering or leaving the stockroom and inspect damaged or spoiled goods. Stock clerks and order fillers sort, organize, and mark items with identifying codes, such as price, stock, or inventory control codes, so that inventories can be located quickly and easily. They also may be required to lift cartons of various sizes. In larger establishments, where they may be responsible for only one task, they may be called stock-control clerks, merchandise distributors, or property custodians. In smaller firms, they also may perform tasks such as packing and mailing items, usually handled by shipping and receiving clerks. (A separate statement on shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks appears elsewhere in the Handbook.)

In many firms, stock clerks and order fillers use hand-held scanners connected to computers to keep inventories up to date. In retail stores, stock clerks bring merchandise to the sales floor and stock shelves and racks. In stockrooms and warehouses, stock clerks store materials in bins, on floors, or on shelves. Instead of putting the merchandise on the sales floor or on shelves, order fillers take customers’ orders and either hold the merchandise until the customers can pick it up or send it to them.

Work environment. Working conditions vary considerably by employment setting. Most jobs for stock clerks and order fillers involve frequent standing, bending, walking, and stretching. Some lifting and carrying of smaller items also may be involved. Although automated devices have lessened the physical demands of this occupation, their use remains somewhat limited. Even though mechanical material handling equipment is employed to move heavy items, the work still can be strenuous.

Evening and weekend hours are common and may be required when large shipments are involved or when inventory is taken.

Related Occupations

Sources: Career Guide to Industries (CGI), Occupational Information Network (O*Net), Occupation Outlook Handbook (OOH)
Earnings

In May 2006, median annual wage-and-salary earnings of stock clerks and order fillers in were $20,440. The middle 50 percent earned between $16,670 and $26,440. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $14,490, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $34,200.

These workers usually receive the same benefits as most other workers. If uniforms are required, employers generally provide them or offer an allowance to purchase them.

For the latest wage information:

The above wage data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey program, unless otherwise noted. For the latest National, State, and local earnings data, visit the following pages:

  • Stock clerks and order fillers
  • Job Outlook

    Employment of stock clerks and order fillers is projected to decline as a result of automation in factories, warehouses, and stores. However, numerous job openings will occur each year due to the need to replace workers who leave the occupation, which is a characteristic of very large occupations with limited training requirements. Because of automation, applicants who are familiar with computers and other electronic office and business equipment will have the best job prospects.

    Employment change. Employment of stock clerks and order fillers is expected to decline moderately by 8 percent over the 2006 to 2016 period. The growing use of computers for inventory control and the installation of new, automated equipment are expected to inhibit growth in demand for stock clerks and order fillers, especially in manufacturing and wholesale trade industries, where operations are most easily automated. In addition to using computerized inventory control systems to sort goods more efficiently, firms in these industries are relying more on sophisticated conveyor belts and automatic high stackers to store and retrieve goods. Also, expanded use of battery-powered, driverless, automatically guided vehicles can be expected.

    The increasing role of large retail outlets and warehouses, as well as catalog, mail, telephone, and Internet shopping services, however, should bolster employment of stock clerks and order fillers in these sectors of retail trade.

    Job prospects. Despite declining employment, numerous job openings will occur each year due to replacement needs. Because of automation, applicants who are familiar with computers and other electronic office and business equipment will have the best job prospects. Since much of the work of stock clerks and order fillers who work in grocery, general merchandise, apparel, accessory, and department stores is done manually and is difficult to automate, workers in these industries should be less affected by automation than workers in manufacturing.

    Employment

    Stock clerks and order fillers held about 1.7 million jobs in 2006. About 78 percent work in wholesale and retail trade. The greatest numbers are found in department stores, followed by grocery stores. Jobs for stock clerks are found in all parts of the country, but most work in large urban areas that have many large suburban shopping centers, warehouses, and factories.

    Knowledge
    • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
    • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
    • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
    • Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
    • Physics — Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
    Skills
    • Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
    • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
    • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
    • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
    • Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
    Abilities
    • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
    • Stamina — The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
    • Explosive Strength — The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
    • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
    • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
    Tasks
    • Supplemental — Sell materials, equipment, and other items from stock in retail settings.
    • Core — Verify inventory computations by comparing them to physical counts of stock, and investigate discrepancies or adjust errors.
    • Supplemental — Issue or distribute materials, products, parts, and supplies to customers or coworkers, based on information from incoming requisitions.
    • Core — Store items in an orderly and accessible manner in warehouses, tool rooms, supply rooms, or other areas.
    • Supplemental — Advise retail customers or internal users on the appropriateness of parts, supplies, or materials requested.
    Activities
    • Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
    • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
    • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
    • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
    • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
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