Occupation Profile for Industrial Machinery Mechanics

Repair, install, adjust, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems.

 
 

Significant Points

  • Most of these workers are employed in manufacturing, but a growing number work for industrial equipment dealers and repair shops.
  • Machinery maintenance workers learn on the job, while industrial machinery mechanics usually need some education after high school plus experience working on specific machines.
  • Applicants with broad skills in machine repair and maintenance should have favorable job prospects.

 

 
 
Overview
$41,050.00 Median Annual Wage 7,000 Average Job Openings Per Year
2.9 Average Unemployment Percentage 55.9 Percentage That Completed High School
261,000 Employment Numbers in 2006 38.8 Percentage That Had Some College
284,000 Employment Numbers in 2016 (est.) 5.3 Percentage That Went Beyond College Degree

Sample Job Titles
Anode Rebuilder
Appliance Fixer
Apprentice, Loom Fixer
Apprentice, Machinist, Composing Room
Apprentice, Machinist, Linotype
Apprentice, Machinist, Outside
Apprentice, Powerhouse Mechanic
Automotive Maintenance Equipment Servicer
Aviation Support Equipment Repairer
Bag Adjuster
Bag Machine Adjuster
Bakery Machine Mechanic
Belt Repairer
Breakdown Man
Breakdown Worker
Broach Setter
Broach Trouble Shooter
Buhr Dresser
Canal Equipment Mechanic
Card Changer, Jacquard Loom
Card Clothier
Case Finishing Machine Adjuster
Cellophane Casting Machine Repairer
Chain Repairer
Changer Fixer
Channel Man
Channel Worker
Clothing Man
Clothing Worker
Comb Fixer
Comb Maker
Comb Setter
Comber Setter
Composing Room Machinist
Conveyor Belt Installer
Conveyor Installer
Conveyor Maintenance Mechanic
Cooling Tower Technician
Deep Submergence Vehicle Crewmember
Electronic Production Line Maintenance Mechanic
Engineer, Tipple
Engineer, Washery
Engineering Technician
Envelope Folding Machine Adjuster
Envelope Machine Adjuster
Erector
Felt Checker
Felt Machine Mechanic
Feltman
Fitter Up
Fixer
Fixer, Machine
Fixture Repairer-Fabricator
Flat Clothier
Foiling Machine Adjuster
Forge Shop Machine Repairer
Forming Machine Adjuster
Frame Fixer
Fuel System Maintenance Worker
Gas Welding Equipment Mechanic
Harness Builder
Hydraulic Press Servicer
Hydraulic Repairer
Hydraulic Rubbish Compactor Mechanic
Hydroelectric Machinery Mechanic
Industrial Electrician
Industrial Machine System Technician
Industrial Machinery Mechanic
Industrial Mechanic
Inspecting Machine Adjuster
Jacquard Fixer
Laundry Machine Mechanic
Lead Operator
Lineman
Liner Replacer
Link Trainer Maintenance Man
Link Trainer Maintenance Worker
Loom Fixer
Loom Technician
Lubrication Equipment Servicer
Machine Adjuster
Machine Clothing Man
Machine Clothing Replacer
Machine Clothing Worker
Machine Fixer
Machine Maintenance, Repair
Machine Mechanic
Machine Operator Slitter Technician
Machine Overhauler
Machine Repairer, Maintenance
Machine Repairman
Machine Tool Rebuilder
Machinery Maintenance Mechanic, Water or Power Generation Plant
Machinist
Machinist Apprentice, Composing Room
Machinist Apprentice, Linotype
Machinist, Linotype
Machinist, Outside
Machinist, Printing
Maintenance Electrician
Maintenance Mechanic
Maintenance Mechanic, Compressed Gas Plant
Maintenance Repairman
Maintenance Technician
Manufacturers Service Representative
Marine Erector
Marine Machinist
Master Machinist
Master Mechanic
Mechanic
Mechanic, Appliance
Mechanic, Area
Mechanic, Bakery Machine
Mechanic, Boilerhouse
Mechanic, Canal Equipment
Mechanic, Conveyor
Mechanic, Conveyor Maintenance
Mechanic, Deck
Mechanic, Dryer and Washer
Mechanic, Electronic Production Line Maintenance
Mechanic, Equipment
Mechanic, Filling Station Equipment
Mechanic, Fluid Power
Mechanic, Foundry Equipment
Mechanic, Garnett
Mechanic, Gasoline Pump
Mechanic, Hydraulic
Mechanic, Hydroelectric Machinery
Mechanic, Industrial
Mechanic, Knitter
Mechanic, Knitting Machine
Mechanic, Laundry, Machine
Mechanic, Linotype
Mechanic, Loom
Mechanic, Machine or Machinery
Mechanic, Machine Tool
Mechanic, Machinery Maintenance, Marine Equipment
Mechanic, Machinery Maintenance, Sewing Machines
Mechanic, Machinery Maintenance, Textile Machines
Mechanic, Maintenance
Mechanic, Marine
Mechanic, Monotype
Mechanic, Oil Field Equipment
Mechanic, Printing Machine
Mechanic, Production
Mechanic, Pump
Mechanic, Regulator
Mechanic, Rig
Mechanic, Roll
Mechanic, Roller
Mechanic, Rubberizing
Mechanic, Service Compressed Gas Equipment
Mechanic, Service Station Equipment
Mechanic, Sewing Machine
Mechanic, Test Engine
Mechanic, Tool
Mechanic, Tooling
Mechanic, Tow Motor
Mechanic, Treatment Plant
Mechanic, Turbine
Mechanic, Underground Mine Machinery
Mechanic, Washing Machine
Mechanic, Wind Tunnel
Mechanic, X Ray Equipment
Mechanist, Printing
Mill Dresser
Mill Set Up
Miller, Head, Wet Process
Miller, Repair
Millwright
Monotype Machinist
Motor Rebuilder
Needle Board Repairer
Needle Straightener
Outfitter
Outside Machinist
Oven Equipment Repairer
Overhauler
Overhauler, Loom
Overhauler, Machine
Parts Salvager
Pin Puller
Pin Pusher
Pin Setter
Pinsetter Adjuster, Automatic
Pneumatic Tool Repairer
Pneumatic Tube Repairer
Powder Line Repairer
Powerhouse Mechanic
Powerhouse Mechanic Apprentice
Press Maintainer
Pump Erector
Pump Mechanic
Pump Servicer
Reed Man
Reed Repairer
Reed Worker
Repairer
Repairer, Appliance
Repairer, Cellophane Casting Machine
Repairer, Chain
Repairer, Chemical Processing Equipment
Repairer, Finished Metal
Repairer, Fixture Fabricator
Repairer, Forge Shop Machine
Repairer, Gas Plant
Repairer, Glass Lined Tank
Repairer, Machine Maintenance
Repairer, Mining and Quarrying Machinery
Repairer, Ore Dressing, Smelting and Refining
Repairer, Powder Line
Repairer, Screen, Crusher
Repairer, Section
Repairer, Switch
Repairer, Water Treatment Plant
Repairer, Wax Pattern
Repairer, Welding Equipment
Repairer, Welding Systems and Equipment
Repairer, Welding, Brazing, and Burning Machines
Roll Cutter
Roll Filler
Roller Coverer
Roller Repairer
Rubberizing Mechanic
Scale Mechanic
Screen and Cyclone Repairer
Screen Repairer, Crusher
Section Leader and Machine Setter
Service Mechanic, Compressed Gas Equipment
Set Up Worker
Sewing Machine Adjuster
Sewing Machine Repairer
Shaker Repairer
Shop Assistant
Shuttle Fixer
Siene Maker
Silk Screen Repairer
Slitter Service and Setter
Spare Fixer
Spindle Plumber
Spinner Fixer
Spray Gun Repairer
Stoker Erector and Servicer
Stone Dresser
Tool and Fixture Repairer
Tool Filer
Tool Setter
Treatment Plant Mechanic
Utility Worker, Roller Shop
Welder
Wheel and Caster Repairer
Winder Fixer
Wire Repairer

Training
  • These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include funeral directors, electricians, forest and conservation technicians, legal secretaries, interviewers, and insurance sales agents.
  • Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree. Some may require a bachelor's degree.
  • Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.
  • Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers.

Machinery maintenance workers can usually get a job with little more than a high school diploma or its equivalent—most learn on the job. Industrial machinery mechanics, on the other hand, usually need some education after high school plus experience working on specific machines before they can be considered a mechanic.

Education and training. Employers prefer to hire those who have taken courses in mechanical drawing, mathematics, blueprint reading, computer programming, or electronics. Entry-level machinery maintenance worker positions generally require a high school diploma, GED, or its equivalent. However, employers increasingly prefer to hire machinery maintenance workers with some training in industrial technology or an area of it, such as fluid power. Machinery maintenance workers typically receive on-the-job training lasting a few months to a year to perform routine tasks, such as setting up, cleaning, lubricating, and starting machinery. This training may be offered by experienced workers, professional trainers, or representatives of equipment manufacturers.

Industrial machinery mechanics usually need a year or more of formal education and training after high school to learn the growing range of mechanical and technical skills that they need. While mechanics used to specialize in one area, such as hydraulics or electronics, many factories now require every mechanic to have knowledge of electricity, electronics, hydraulics, and computer programming.

Workers can get this training in a number of different ways. Experience in the military repairing equipment, particularly ships, is highly valued by employers. Also, 2-year associate degree programs in industrial maintenance are good preparation. Some employers offer 4-year apprenticeship programs that combine classroom instruction with paid on-the-job-training. Apprenticeship programs usually are sponsored by a local trade union. Other mechanics may start as helpers or in other factory jobs and learn the skills of the trade informally and by taking courses offered through their employer. Classroom instruction focuses on subjects such as shop mathematics, blueprint reading, welding, electronics, and computer training. In addition to classroom training, it is important that mechanics train on the specific machines they will repair. They can get this training on the job, through dealer or manufacturer’s representatives or in a classroom.

Other qualifications. Mechanical aptitude and manual dexterity are important for workers in this occupation. Good reading comprehension is also necessary to understand the technical manuals of a wide range of machines. And, good physical conditioning and agility are necessary because repairers sometimes have to lift heavy objects or climb to reach equipment.

Advancement. Opportunities for advancement vary by specialty. Machinery maintenance workers, if they take classes and gain additional skills, may advance to industrial machinery mechanic or supervisor. Industrial machinery mechanics also advance by working with more complicated equipment and gaining additional repair skills. The most highly skilled repairers can be promoted to supervisor, master mechanic, or millwright.

Nature of Work

Imagine an automobile assembly line: a large conveyor system moves unfinished automobiles down the line, giant robotic welding arms bond the different body panels together, hydraulic lifts move the motor into the body of the car, and giant presses stamp body parts from flat sheets of steel. All of these machines—the hydraulic lifts, the robotic welders, the conveyor system, and the giant presses—sometimes break down. When the assembly line stops because a machine breaks down, it costs the company money. Industrial machinery mechanics and machinery maintenance workers maintain and repair these very different, and often very expensive, machines.

The most basic tasks are performed by machinery maintenance workers. These employees are responsible for cleaning and lubricating machinery, performing basic diagnostic tests, checking performance, and testing damaged machine parts to determine whether major repairs are necessary. In carrying out these tasks, maintenance workers must follow machine specifications and adhere to maintenance schedules. Maintenance workers may perform minor repairs, but major repairs are generally left to machinery mechanics.

Industrial machinery mechanics, also called industrial machinery repairers or maintenance machinists, are highly skilled workers who maintain and repair machinery in a plant or factory. To do this effectively, they must be able to detect minor problems and correct them before they become major. Machinery mechanics use technical manuals, their understanding of the equipment, and careful observation to discover the cause of the problem. For example, after hearing a vibration from a machine, the mechanic must decide whether it is due to worn belts, weak motor bearings, or some other problem. Mechanics need years of training and experience to diagnose problems, but computerized diagnostic systems and vibration analysis techniques provide aid in determining the nature of the problem.

After diagnosing the problem, the industrial machinery mechanic disassembles the equipment to repair or replace the necessary parts. When repairing electronically controlled machinery, mechanics may work closely with electronic repairers or electricians who maintain the machine’s electronic parts. (Electrical and electronics installers and repairers, as well as electricians, appear elsewhere in the Handbook.) Increasingly, mechanics are expected to have the electrical, electronics, and computer programming skills to repair sophisticated equipment on their own. Once a repair is made, mechanics perform tests to ensure that the machine is running smoothly.

Primary responsibilities of industrial machinery mechanics also often include preventive maintenance and the installation of new machinery. For example, they adjust and calibrate automated manufacturing equipment, such as industrial robots. Part of setting up equipment is programming the programmable logic control (PLC), a frequently used type of computer used as the control system for automated industrial machines. Situating and installing machinery has traditionally been the job of millwrights, but as plants retool and invest in new equipment, companies increasingly rely on mechanics to do this task for some machinery. (A section on millwrights appears elsewhere in the Handbook.)

Industrial machinery mechanics and machinery maintenance workers use a variety of tools to perform repairs and preventive maintenance. They may use handtools to adjust a motor or a chain hoist to lift a heavy printing press off the ground. When replacements for broken or defective parts are not readily available, or when a machine must be quickly returned to production, mechanics may create a new part using lathes, grinders, or drill presses. Mechanics use catalogs to order replacement parts and often follow blueprints, technical manuals, and engineering specifications to maintain and fix equipment. By keeping complete and up-to-date records, mechanics try to anticipate trouble and service equipment before factory production is interrupted.

Work environment. In production facilities, these workers are subject to common shop injuries such as cuts, bruises, and strains. They also may work in awkward positions, including on top of ladders or in cramped conditions under large machinery, which exposes them to additional hazards. They often use protective equipment such as hardhats, safety glasses, steel-tipped shoes, hearing protectors, and belts.

Because factories and other facilities cannot afford to have industrial machinery out of service for long periods, mechanics may be on call or assigned to work nights or on weekends. Overtime is common among full-time industrial machinery mechanics; about 30 percent work over 40 hours a week.

Related Occupations

Sources: Career Guide to Industries (CGI), Occupational Information Network (O*Net), Occupation Outlook Handbook (OOH)
Earnings

Median hourly wage-and-salary earnings of industrial machinery mechanics were $19.74 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $15.87 and $24.46. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $12.84, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $29.85.

Machinery maintenance workers earned somewhat less than the higher skilled industrial machinery mechanics. Median hourly wage-and-salary earnings of machinery maintenance workers were $16.61 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $12.91 and $21.53. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $10.29, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $26.46.

Earnings vary by industry and geographic region. Median hourly wage-and-salary earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of industrial machinery mechanics are:

Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution $26.02
Motor vehicle parts manufacturing 24.97
Machinery, equipment, and supplies merchant wholesalers 18.94
Plastics product manufacturing 18.79
Commercial and industrial machinery and equipment (except automotive and electronic) repair and maintenance 17.78

About 18 percent of industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers are union members. Labor unions that represent these workers include the United Steelworkers of America; the United Auto Workers; the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers; the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America; and the International Union of Electronic, Electrical, Salaried, Machine, and Furniture Workers-Communications Workers of America.

For the latest wage information:

The above wage data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey program, unless otherwise noted. For the latest National, State, and local earnings data, visit the following pages:

  • Industrial machinery mechanics
  • Maintenance workers, machinery
  • Job Outlook

    Employment of industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers is projected to grow about as fast as average, and job prospects should be favorable for those with a variety of repair skills.

    Employment change. Employment of industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers is expected to grow 7 percent from 2006 to 2016, about as fast as the average for all occupations. As factories become increasingly automated, these workers will be needed to maintain and repair the automated equipment. However, many new machines are more reliable and capable of self-diagnosis, making repairs easier and quicker and somewhat slowing the growth of repairer jobs.

    Industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers are not as affected by changes in production levels as other manufacturing workers. During slack periods, when some plant workers are laid off, mechanics often are retained to do major overhaul jobs and to keep expensive machinery in working order. In addition, replacing highly skilled and experienced industrial maintenance workers is quite difficult, which discourages lay-offs.

    Job prospects. Applicants with broad skills in machine repair and maintenance should have favorable job prospects. Many mechanics are expected to retire in coming years, and employers have reported difficulty in recruiting young workers with the necessary skills to be industrial machinery mechanics. In addition to openings from growth, most job openings will stem from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or who retire or leave the labor force for other reasons.

    Employment

    Industrial machinery mechanics and maintenance workers held about 345,000 jobs in 2006. Of these, 261,000 were held by the more highly skilled industrial machinery mechanics, while machinery maintenance workers accounted for 84,000 jobs. The majority of both types of workers were employed in the manufacturing sector in industries such as food processing and chemical, fabricated metal product, machinery, and motor vehicle and parts manufacturing. Additionally, about 9 percent work in wholesale trade, mostly for dealers of industrial equipment. Manufacturers often rely on these dealers to make complex repairs to specific machines. About 7 percent of mechanics work for the commercial and industrial machinery and equipment repair and maintenance industry, often making site visits to companies to repair equipment. Local governments employ a number of machinery maintenance workers, but few mechanics.

    Knowledge
    • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
    • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
    • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
    • Medicine and Dentistry — Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
    • Physics — Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
    Skills
    • Equipment Maintenance — Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
    • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
    • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
    • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
    • Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
    Abilities
    • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
    • Stamina — The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
    • Explosive Strength — The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
    • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
    • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
    Tasks
    • Core — Clean, lubricate, and adjust parts, equipment, and machinery.
    • Core — Operate newly repaired machinery and equipment to verify the adequacy of repairs.
    • Core — Analyze test results, machine error messages, and information obtained from operators in order to diagnose equipment problems.
    • Core — Record repairs and maintenance performed.
    • Core — Study blueprints and manufacturers' manuals to determine correct installation and operation of machinery.
    Activities
    • Monitoring and Controlling Resources — Monitoring and controlling resources and overseeing the spending of money.
    • Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.
    • Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
    • Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment — Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.
    • Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
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